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Last crew member of Enola Gay dies in Georgia

Tuesday, 5:33 PM

In this May 21, 2009 file photo, Theodore "Dutch'' Van Kirk visits a veteran's group at the Golden Corral in Macon, Ga. The navigator for the Enola Gay spoke about his experience guiding the aircraft that dropped the first atomic bomb. Tom Van Kirk says his 93-year-old father died in Stone Mountain, Ga. on Monday, July 28, 2014. He was the last surviving member of a crew that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. (AP Photo/The Macon Telegraph, Beau Cabell, File)The last surviving member of the crew that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima has died in Georgia.


Twitter 2Q results soar, stock flies high

Tuesday, 5:33 PM

FILE - This Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, file photo shows a Twitter app on an iPhone screen, in New York. Twitter reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Stronger-than-expected results pushed Twitter's stock sharply higher on Tuesday after the short messaging service said its revenue more than doubled in the second quarter.


Islamists take main military base in Benghazi

Tuesday, 5:48 PM

Benghazi (Libya) (AFP) - Islamist groups seized the headquarters of the Libyan army's special forces in Benghazi after several days of heavy fighting, military officials and the Islamists said Wednesday.


Senate passes highway bill, sends it back to House

Tuesday, 5:38 PM

FILE - This April 14, 2014 file photo shows a section of the I-75 Phase II modernization project under way in Dayton, Ohio. The Senate is set to take up legislation to keep federal highway money flowing to states, with just three days left before the government plans to start slowing down payments. The House passed a $10.8 billion bill last week that would pay for highway and transit aid through the end of May 2015 if transportation spending is maintained at current levels. Under a schedule outlined by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., the Senate would take up that bill Tuesday. (AP Photo/Skip Peterson, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted Tuesday to keep federal highway money flowing to the states into December but only after rejecting the House's reliance on what lawmakers called a funding "gimmick" and moving to force a post-election debate on whether to raise gasoline taxes.


NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

Tuesday, 5:45 PM

FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2004 file photo, Bloomington High School running back Adrian Arrington tries to clear a pile of Providence Catholic defenders during the Class 6A championship football game in Champaign, Ill. Arrington, who later went on to play at Eastern Illinois in Charleston, is the lead plaintiff in a class-action head injury lawsuit working its way through federal court in Chicago. The NCAA and the plaintiffs announced a settlement on Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/ Stephen Haas, File)CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA agreed on Tuesday to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports' governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn't go nearly far enough.


Open champion McIlroy not one to rest on his laurels

Tuesday, 5:09 PM

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland celebrates as he holds the Claret Jug after winning the British Open Championship at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake(Reuters) - Rory McIlroy embellished his status as one of the game's best players with his wire-to-wire win at the British Open nine days ago, but has put that behind him as he strives to achieve further goals before the end of this year. "I've obviously had a bit of time to reflect after the (British) Open and everything, but just decided I wanted to move on and move forward," world number two McIlroy told reporters at Firestone Country Club on Tuesday. So I definitely wasn't going to dwell on what I'd done at Hoylake (venue for the British Open). I've never won a World Golf Championship.


NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

Tuesday, 5:45 PM

FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2004 file photo, Bloomington High School running back Adrian Arrington tries to clear a pile of Providence Catholic defenders during the Class 6A championship football game in Champaign, Ill. Arrington, who later went on to play at Eastern Illinois in Charleston, is the lead plaintiff in a class-action head injury lawsuit working its way through federal court in Chicago. The NCAA and the plaintiffs announced a settlement on Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/ Stephen Haas, File)CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA agreed on Tuesday to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports' governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn't go nearly far enough.


Senate passes highway bill, sends it back to House

Tuesday, 5:38 PM

FILE - This April 14, 2014 file photo shows a section of the I-75 Phase II modernization project under way in Dayton, Ohio. The Senate is set to take up legislation to keep federal highway money flowing to states, with just three days left before the government plans to start slowing down payments. The House passed a $10.8 billion bill last week that would pay for highway and transit aid through the end of May 2015 if transportation spending is maintained at current levels. Under a schedule outlined by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., the Senate would take up that bill Tuesday. (AP Photo/Skip Peterson, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted Tuesday to keep federal highway money flowing to the states into December but only after rejecting the House's reliance on what lawmakers called a funding "gimmick" and moving to force a post-election debate on whether to raise gasoline taxes.


Argentine economy minister in New York for last ditch talks

Tuesday, 5:08 PM

Pargament, deputy attorney general for Argentina, arrives for debt negotiation talks with court-appointed mediator Daniel Pollack in New YorkBy Daniel Bases and Jorge Otaola NEW YORK/BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - Argentine Economy Minister Axel Kicillof unexpectedly arrived in New York on Tuesday to join last-minute debt negotiations with "holdout" investors in a bid to avert a default. After a long battle in the U.S. courts, Argentina has until the end of Wednesday to either pay in full the hedge funds that rejected its restructuring on their defaulted bonds, cut a deal or win a stay of the court order that triggered the deadline. Argentina's isolation from global credit markets since its 2002 default on $100 billion means a default would be highly unlikely to cause financial turmoil abroad, but it would hurt a domestic economy already in recession. The scant progress made in talks, and Kicillof's absence, had raised questions over Argentina's commitment to reach a settlement with the holdouts.


The Agility Factor

Tuesday, 4:59 PM

The Agility FactorThe Beatles' Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band changed the way people think about music; it is regarded as one of the most pivotal music releases of all time. Pop star Phil Collins said that it opened a door and showed people a new room.But the door had already been opened for the Beatles. Paul McCartney said that the single biggest...


NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

Tuesday, 5:45 PM

FILE - In this Nov. 27, 2004 file photo, Bloomington High School running back Adrian Arrington tries to clear a pile of Providence Catholic defenders during the Class 6A championship football game in Champaign, Ill. Arrington, who later went on to play at Eastern Illinois in Charleston, is the lead plaintiff in a class-action head injury lawsuit working its way through federal court in Chicago. The NCAA and the plaintiffs announced a settlement on Tuesday, July 29, 2014. (AP Photo/ Stephen Haas, File)CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA agreed on Tuesday to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports' governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn't go nearly far enough.


Fruit and veg: Five-a-day is OK, says study

Tuesday, 5:11 PM

Shoppers buy vegatables at a local Farmers Market in Annandale, Virginia, August 8, 2013British nutritionists threw down the gauntlet to dietary guidelines in April by declaring seven daily portions of fresh fruit and vegetables, rather than the recommended five, were the key to health. Every additional daily serving of fruit and vegetables reduced the average risk of premature death from all causes by five percent, the scientists found. "We found a threshold of around five servings a day of fruit and vegetables, after which the risk of death did not reduce further," said the investigators, led by Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. In addition to advising patients about the virtues of healthy eating, doctors should also push home the message about risks from obesity, inactivity, smoking and excessive drinking, said the paper.